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Agenda 2063 is the 50-year plan for the 55 nations of the African Union.  It was adopted in 2013 and has 7 beautiful Aspirations.  (https://au.int/en/agenda2063/aspirations)

 

Specifically,

 

Aspiration #4 is for: “A Peaceful and Secure Africa”

 

This Aspirations calls for “peace education” as follows:

 

“A culture of peace and tolerance shall be nurtured in Africa’s children and youth through peace education.”

 

The African Union put in place the First Ten Year Implementation Plan (FTYIP) to help achieve these 50-year goals.  (https://au.int/en/agenda2063/ftyip)

 

This FTYIP has 15 Flagship Projects and several listed Key Transformational Outcomes.  None of these Projects or Outcomes even mentions “peace education” or provides any language to inspire of accelerate the required definition and curriculum development efforts.

 

This is where Project Peace Lights comes in.  Learn More

Project Peace Lights is dedicated to facilitating the definition and development of a peace education curriculum for the African Union.  

 

This will be accomplished by Africans representatives from each country and led by professional moderators from African Universities with specific experience chairing and running successful curriculum development working groups in the past.  

 

 

Here’s the problem:

 

No organization or working group can “drive down” peace education into tribes around Africa.  In response to this challenge, a straightforward and scalable plan to involve each and every tribe has been developed, modelled, and vetted with several Diaspora organizations.  This is more a challenge of scale rather than one of complexity.  

Project Peace Lights is dedicated to facilitating the definition and development of a peace education curriculum for the African Union.  

 

This will be accomplished by Africans representatives from each country and led by professional moderators from African Universities with specific experience chairing and running successful curriculum development working groups in the past.  

 

 

Here’s the problem:

 

No organization or working group can “drive down” peace education into tribes around Africa.  In response to this challenge, a straightforward and scalable plan to involve each and every tribe has been developed, modelled, and vetted with several Diaspora organizations.  This is more a challenge of scale rather than one of complexity.  

Project Peace Lights is dedicated to facilitating the definition and development of a peace education curriculum for the African Union.  

 

This will be accomplished by Africans representatives from each country and led by professional moderators from African Universities with specific experience chairing and running successful curriculum development working groups in the past.  

 

 

Here’s the problem:

 

No organization or working group can “drive down” peace education into tribes around Africa.  In response to this challenge, a straightforward and scalable plan to involve each and every tribe has been developed, modelled, and vetted with several Diaspora organizations.  This is more a challenge of scale rather than one of complexity.  

 

[Learn about the Pan-African Peace Education Curriculum Development Working Group]

 

[Learn about the Peace Education Tribal Outreach & Inclusion Program]

 

 

Did you know that Pan-African Curriculum Development Working Groups have happened in the past?

 

Curriculum development working groups are not new, but never before has an effort of such scale been undertaken for such a noble cause.

 

Project Peace Lights has taken financial and operational models from past successful Pan-African Curriculum Development Working Groups.  With the help of the organizers of those meetings, they have been scaled and enhanced, creating a credible, inclusive initiative to bring together delegates from each country to three (3) Working Group meetings over 24 months.  

 

It’s like hosting 3 conferences within 24 – 36 months at 3 different locations in Africa.  But to ensure success and inclusion, our models include covering the costs of the attendees, travel, locations, food, security, interpreters, per diems, etc.   

 

Would the total cost of hosting 3 conference-like events for ~175 attendees be worth it if the timeline for accelerating peace education for 1.3 Billion people was 10 years or more?  The answer is a resounding YES.

 

The Working Group Steering Committee is being led by Dr. Mamadou Drame, who has chaired several successful Pan-African Working Group meetings.  Dr. Drame is a highly respected Professor at Cheikh Anta Diop University in Dakar, Senegal.

 

Travel, accommodations, security, interpreters, food and per diem expenses, etc. are all calculated into a well-articulated and measurable plan to achieve the goals of creating a practical and inclusive peace education curriculum that can be rolled out to all 55 nations of the African Union.

 

This plan is being endorsed by several notable figures and Diaspora organizations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is “Peace Education”?

 

“Peace Education” is an ill-defined term.  It can mean a lot of things and includes many topics.  What we do know that peace education is “not” 100 things.  It is a small finite list of topics.  Maybe a dozen or maybe 20.  Here are a couple examples:  

 

 

 

The point is that this small finite number of topics is something that a motivated professional working group can get their arms around.  These topics can be defined, agreed in an inclusive way, and a curriculum for primary and secondary created.

 

There is one more important thing that is known.  Whatever these topics are determined to include, they sit on a foundation of Human Rights.

 

The African Union 50-year plan, Agenda 2063 calls for children to become exposed to and taught “Peace Education” from a young age.  

 

 

 

 

 

[Learn more about the Universal Declaration of Human Rights]

[Learn about the Peace Education Curriculum Development Working Group]

 

 

 

Claudette Colvin was arrested on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama on March 2, 1955.  This was 9-months BEFORE Rosa Parks.  

[Claudette pic]

 

It was Claudette Colvin’s actions that day that catalyzed the NAACP to begin strategizing on the plans that would eventually lead to Rosa Parks’ arrest, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and many other highly impactful steps along the road of the American Civil Rights Movement.

 

[Rosa Parks, Bus Boycott pics]

 

Martin Luther King’s very first public action as a young pastor outside his congregation was to raise funds for the defense of Claudette Colvin.

 

[MLK pic]

 

It was Claudette Colvin’s lawsuit (Browder vs. Gayle) that went up to the Supreme Court and changed the law.

 

Critically, Claudette Colvin was able to do what she did on the bus that March day because she knew her rights!  She was taught those right, in part, in her high school where she was an honor student.

 

According to the book, Twice Towards Justice, by author Philip Hoose, she is credited with

 

“accelerating the change in the plight of colored people”.       [Book pic]

 

Since “the plight of colored people” in 1955 could legitimately be measured in Deaths/Day, this means that she LITERALLY saved lives.  

 

 

 

If Claudette Colvin literally saved lives, then those that taught her those rights also LITERALLY saved lives.  One of these people was her teacher Mrs. Geraldine Nesbitt.

 

Moreover, it is the content of what she taught the class that made the difference.  That content would not fully define, but would fall under the umbrella of “Peace Education”

 

 

 

 

 

Peace Education Tribal Outreach and Inclusion Program

 

In Africa, you cannot develop a peace education curriculum and expect to drive it down to the tribal level.  There must be involvement and participation to be successful.  In actual fact, addressing localized, religious, and ethnic concerns is a fundamental success criteria of the entire effort.

 

A detailed and scalable plan to accomplish tribal involvement has been developed and vetted by several Diaspora groups, United Nations dignitaries, and industry experts worldwide.  Financial models have been created to hire teams in every country to visit each tribe and host a “Day of Discussion on Peace Education”.

 

The teams visiting the tribes will consist of three (3) respected professionals.  A teacher, a doctor, and a government worker are the target professions.  These roles will be decided based on interviews and the chosen individuals (along with support and logistics people) will be fully trained in a manner consistent throughout the entire Continent.

 

These “Days of Discussion” will not involve trying to “sell” tribes on the notion of peace education.  Rather, they will be interactive sessions used to describe the process being undertaken by the Pan-African Curriculum Development Working Group, as well as to engage tribal leaders, elders, and youth in the process.  Ongoing feedback and communication to and from the working group will be part of the process.

 

Importantly, food and drink will be provided as part of these “Days of Discussion”.  The sessions will be coordinated through the “Women and Children’ Coordinators” in each tribe.  It is known that every tribe in all of Africa have these Coordinators and that they are women.  This dovetails beautifully into United Nations Resolution 1325 which specifically calls for women to take a more active role in peace-related issues, specifically, as they relate to longstanding peace.  Peace Education falls squarely into this category and we expect that these Days of Discussion will be easily embraced by Coordinators and Elders alike.  And, of course, by the Youth.

 

Project Peace Lights is working with several Diaspora organizations to help facilitate and enhance the tribal outreach meetings and we expect similar partnerships with several other organizations including local in-country organizations.  As an example, Youth For Human Rights International, a world-leading organization already well established in Africa could provide a day of human rights introduction education to children during these Days of Discussion.  Similarly, various Diaspora groups have contributed other good ideas to make these days more impactful and productive.

 

Each country and region will have dedicated people responsible for the successful rollout and execution of the plan including reporting the measurable results.  Several countries will require multiple teams to meet the required timelines given the number of required visits or to accommodate geographical, language, or other requirements.